World-Architects Daily News

      

Thursday, February 04, 2016

Today's archidose #882

Here are some photos of Labyrinth (2015) at C-Mine in Genk, Belgium, by Gijs Van Vaerenbergh, photographed by Joris D'Haese.

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To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose

Wednesday, February 03, 2016

Comic Book of the Moment

Yesterday, quite to my surprise, this new book arrived in the mail:



The Life of an Architect… and what he leaves behind (note the little house at the bottom of the cover) is the print version of Mike Herman's arch., an online comic strip "about the life of architect Archibald and his daily struggle with his office colleagues, employees, clients, contractors, civil servants, consultants, architecture critics and other people involved in the building industry."



DOM Publishers' print version is just right. The horizontal format lends itself to the typically three-pane comics. And with one per page the 128-page book can be read in one sitting. The strips aren't bad either!



Here's the description from DOM's website:
"This title is about the life of architect Archibald and his daily struggle with his office colleagues, employees, clients, contractors, civil servants, consultants, architecture critics, and other people involved in the building industry. Archibald runs an architecture office with his partner and engineer, Gerald. While Archibald is a visionary and a romantic dreamer with a tendency to idealistic and egocentric behavior, Gerald is the rational one who keeps his feet on the ground. An exploited intern named Ralph; a narrowminded IT-specialist named John, and a weird Asian cardboard model builder named Mr. Shan also work in their office. Archibald is married to Charlotte, a succesful lawyer who quit her job to help Archibald clean up his administrative mess. They have two children: Archie, his six-year-old son who wants to be the best architect in the world and Charly, a smart-mouthed ten-year-old daughter with a strong dislike for everything regarding art."
And here's a link to buy the book at Amazon:

Tuesday, February 02, 2016

What a Difference 15 Years Makes

These two photographs of OAB's Botanical Garden Barcelona composed into an animated GIF are a reminder to architects – if an obvious point to landscape architects – that landscapes have a way of changing pretty quickly.


[Photos: Alejo Bagué, via Spanish-Architects]

I'm guessing the b/w photo was taken when the garden was completed in 1999, and the color one was taken fairly recently.

Must-read Reader

Click on the image to download a free PDF of Architecture and Empathy, with essays by Juhani Pallasmaa, Harry Francis Mallgrave, Sarah Robinson and Vittorio Gallese as well as a conversation between the four contributors.



Thanks to Scott G. for the tip.

It's Groundhog Day...

...yet again. But how many days does Bill Murray's character actually spend reliving the day over and over and over again in Groundhog Day?

Monday, February 01, 2016

Building of the Year 2015

A tower with a photovoltaic facade is Building of the Year: With 20 percent of the votes, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture's (AS+GG) FKI Tower in Seoul, South Korea, has won the Building of the Year 2015 on American-Architects.



Visit World-Architects to learn more about the FKI Tower and see the runners-up.

Friday, January 29, 2016

Vote for Building of the Year 2015

Sunday is the lat day to vote for the Building of the Year 2015 at American-Architects. The Building of the Week is a feature I curate for the platform, and for 2015 the theme was overseas buildings by US architects with some of the inverse: buildings in North America by foreign firms. Easier said than done: the criteria made it hard to fill 50 slots, so there are only 36 (37 with a Barcelona project that was put in for the launch of Catalan-Architects). Regardless, its'a solid selection of buildings, with big names (Renzo Piano, Bernard Tschumi, Richard Meier SANAA, David Adjaye) balanced by lesser-known architects (Zoka Zola, Sharon Davis, Biber Architects, SsD) and plenty in between. Below is a screenshot of the buildings in the running; click on the image or here to go vote for your favorite. The winner will be announced online Monday and in the eMagazine that lands in inboxes on Tuesday.

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

Today's archidose #881

Here are some photos of the Cemetery Building (2010) in Erlenbach, Switzerland, by AFGH / Andreas Fuhrimann Gabrielle Hächler, photographed by Trevor Patt.

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To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Easy Come, Easy Go

Yesterday the New York Times reported on MoMA's latest renovation plans, something that has not been on my radar for about two years, when they put their foot down on demolishing the Folk Art Museum. The most unfortunate news is that the most interesting – and public – components in Diller Scofidio + Renfro's schematic plans (the "Art Bay" and the public sculpture garden entrance) are gone:



This news should hardly come as a surprise to anybody following MoMA's latest renovation, which kicked off with the demolition of Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects' 2001 American Folk Art Museum next door. Sure, DS+R tried to save that contemporary gem (and then explained to a packed house whey they couldn't), but with MoMA's concerns focused squarely on dealing with the hordes of ticketed museum-goers generated by, but not adequately addressed in the 2004 Yoshio Taniguchi expansion, there's just no room for publicly inviting gestures. In the case of the "Art Bay," MoMA director Glenn Lowry said, "It became clear that there was a better solution." The better solution is a gallery, still public and visible from the street, but only accessible from the MoMA lobby. The "Art Bay"'s literal connection of the museum to the sidewalk – what I see as a huge opportunity and very-New York thing – is gone, erased just as easily as it was put into the rendering.

Drawings of the latest DS+R plans via the New York Times:

Monday, January 25, 2016

Today's archidose #880

Here are some photos of Bunker 599 (2010) in the Netherlands by RAAAF and Atelier de Lyon, photographed by Maurice Tjon a Tham.

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And the making of Bunker 599 from RAAAF:


To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose